Reading, Eating, Etc.

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Good reads, eats, and lots and lots of rambling:

Reading

One of my Lenten resolutions, the only one I’ve been keeping faithfully, has been to read only spiritual reading. I drag my feet to do it because fiction is so much easier to sink your teeth into, but it actually has been a beneficial exercise. So, I read The Screwtape Letters (for my bookclub) and it was an excellent examination of conscience and I’m still working my way through I Believe in Love (also a bookclub pick from way back in December). It’s slow going but I may actually end up adding it to my life-changers list because it really does come back to me on a daily basis and affects the way I think and act. I can’t wait for Easter though, because I have Middlemarch on the dock.

Articles

-I loved this post on Dominicana Journal about being Homesick for Heaven. It’s good to remember, when all the blogs and ig feeds you follow try to convince you otherwise, that no place, not the English countryside nor the streets of Paris, and no home, not a charming brownstone in a bustling city or a bright and airy one hundred year old farmhouse can cure us of the homesickness of heaven: “We shall be haunted by a nostalgia for divine things, by a homesickness for God which is not eased in this world even by the presence of God.” (And also, good to remember when you’re tired of the flat, hot, noisy city you live in or of shuffling from apartment to apartment that as St. Samthann says, “Heaven can be reached from any place on Earth.”)

-I don’t know what our children’s education is going to look like. I often think of how much richer my education would have been if I had gotten to follow a classical curriculum. But you know, private school=tuition, homeschooling=being solely responsible for your children’s education=ahhhh. Anyway, I know we will at least be having culture hour once a week.

A lovely article my sister sent me and also full of good reminders about raising and educating children.

“The pressure to achieve can corrupt the activity itself…not just playing the piano. If we fail to recognize the dangers, we can become enslaved to the world’s standards of value. What matters is not the richness of an individual’s experience, but the degrees earned, prizes won, schools attended, articles published, patents filed, movies made, books written. And this is true for religious people as well as secularists. We tend to become part of this culture of achievement even if we don’t mean to. And it’s increasingly true for children, who sense early on that they must make something of themselves and find an identity in some sort of accomplishment.”

-Are you an HSP? I’d heard the term floating around and thought, “Oh yes, I’m probably that.” But then I actually started reading more about it and dude….it explains so much about my whole life. The fact that I couldn’t deal with the seams on my socks when I was in Kindergarten, that anytime I’m in a tense situation, whether it’s just being in the presence of arguing people or sensing any sort of danger, I feel like I’m going to completely shut down or lose it, that my one customer service gig with a stressful boss and rude customers gave me so much freaking anxiety, that bad memories stay with me foreeeever, that I absolutely cannot handle any remotely scary movies or shows because those images stick in my mind, that I felt like I was having a mental breakdown every day when I was regularly watching my five month old nephew and my two month old son at the same time, that when Leo won’t stop whining, I have to shut myself in a room for a minute and scream into my hands. So I guess I have to figure out how to deal with it now…

-Joe and I are on a marriage panel tonight for our alma mater’s Theology of the Body club. I feel like we are so not qualified to talk about marriage because we’ve only been at it for three-ish years now, and frankly, I suck at the whole putting other people before myself part of marriage…which is like the main part of marriage. But I suppose that’s the point of an event like this. Not to show how easy and marvelous marriage is, but to admit how hard but good (and even still marvelous) it is. But anyway some other people talking about marriage who have better things to say:

The Benedictine Confessional

“Christian marriage—like any marriage—is hard work. It’s ascetical. It’s about the halting, faltering effort to unlearn selfishness and gradually grow in love—not just love for another human being but love for another sinning human being…’Your marriage is a covenant that must stand firm even if your spouse becomes a threat to your tranquility and personal fulfillment, even if the time should come when you feel that the other who shares your bed has become—for the moment, at least—your enemy. Jesus has taught us to love our enemies.'”

You’re still a bride after your wedding day, even when you don’t feel like one.

Know this: married dreams brought down to earth are good; your calling specifically heralded at this moment in time. It’s okay to feel like your wedding is a lot to come down from, and that you walked into a new, unfamiliar version of yourself as you walked out the church doors. Imagining married life in broad strokes is easy and it’s dreamy, but it’s the subtleties life layers on that pave most of our road to holiness.”

Can marriage work with all those kids?!?!

“Yes, kids are hard,  Yes, we work harder at our marriages with little people around, but don’t lose sight of the all important fact:  Love propels us into this crazy thing of marriage and family life, and Love will see us through all the many challenges because as St. Paul tells us in 1 Corinthians: Love never fails.  Or at least, if we don’t let it!  If we don’t resist or reject Love, it never fails us.  This is the hope we carry with us as we make our vows to each other.”

-Last one, I promise! This article from Eve Tushnet reflecting about a Catholic understanding of the body seems particularly appropriate for Holy Week.

Eating

Celebrations

-My roommate and her husband were in town for a couple hours on St. Patrick’s Day so I made this beer cheese soup (not a very Irish recipe but I used Kerrygold cheddar and nixed all the peppers). We enjoyed it with Irish brown bread and together they were crazy good.

-Another one of my dear friends had a birthday last week and I got to make the cake. Her only request was that it be chocolate so I went with another “best ever” recipe. It got rave reviews even though I forgot to frost the middle.

Comfort food

-Sometimes you just need a giant pile of noodles. One of my best friends/Leo’s godmama came over for dinner one night and we made shrimp lo mein and scallion pancakes (inspired by Katherine’s post.) Everything was gloriously comforting and oily.

Turkey bolognese and spaghetti squash with toasted panko and pine nut topping. (loosely based on this recipe.) Joe got home late that night so I ate beforehand and had a really hard time not eating all the bolognese out the pot before he got a chance to have dinner.

Brunches

If you follow me on Instagram, you know I have a thing for brunching fancy at home. It started when Leo switched to one nap a day and I didn’t get to sit down to eat until 11. I munch on dry cereal first thing in the morning but if I try to sit down and eat breakfast, Leo (who’s already eaten his fill of scrambled eggs and oatmeal) finds it unacceptable and cries and claws at my legs. Sweet child.

Anyway, I celebrate my daily two hours of silence by trying to make fancy things out of fridge leftovers. And when I can turn out something worthy of going on a bistro brunch menu, I give myself a little pat on the back, snap a picture, and upload it on the gram. Morning rituals and all that. Favorites have been:

whole wheat couscous, basil, cherry tomatoes, pine nuts, sundried tomatoes, a soft-boiled egg, balsamic vinegar, and tuna (the good kind packed in a jar with capers and olive oil–makes all the difference.)

Roasted artichoke, shallot-mustard compound butter, and poached eggs on top of sourdough toast.

Biscuits and gravy. My mom gave me Red Lobster biscuit mix when I went over to her house and I’m never one to turn away free food. Oh man, this combo was good. For the sausage I just fried up ground beef and added maple syrup, brown sugar, and some spices. For the gravy I threw butter, flour, and water into the ground beef mixture and let it all come together.

Leftover Korean beef and rice with a fried egg on top. I would actually cut the sugar down in the beef recipe if I made it again. It was too sweet for me, but with the egg it did taste like asian takeout, so that’s always a win.

Breakfast tacos. Always, always. So easy to throw together and so satisfying.

I don’t eat like this every day. Some days it’s cold pizza or cereal. Today it was just a piece of toast. And really, this is a celebration of nap time, so whatever the meal, it’s still every bit as luxurious.

Etc.

Wishing everyone a blessed Holy Week, Passiontide, and Easter Sunday/Season!

Reading, Eating, Etc.

Wine-Poached Pear and Goat Cheese Ricotta Tart

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Have you made new years’ resolutions yet? Healthier eating is one of mine, but I’m trying to be realistic about it. My sister tried to rein me into Whole 30 this month, but any diet that tries to eliminate bread feels suspicious to me. Also, I find it really weird that strips of heart disease (i.e. bacon) are allowed and pebbles of life (i.e. lentils) aren’t. Tonight I’m giving the bird to Whole 30 and making a lentil stew.

I love and hate resolutions. They feel so fresh and hopeful. But then there’s so much personal growth I feel I need to do and I have too keen a knowledge of my wimpy will power, so looking at the long list of resolutions I’ve made just makes me want to curl up in a basket of warm laundry and eat something sweet. That’s where this tart comes in. It’s a babe of a dessert, indulgent in its perfect marriage of flavors. The sugar in it is minimal. You can add more if you wish, but that’s between you and your resolutions. Eat it with friends over a bottle of port and you will have done more for your well-being than Whole 30 could ever promise. At least I like to think so. I’ll make a definitive conclusion in 28 days when my sister emerges from her bread-less existence either glowing and goddess-like or dispirited and ravenous.

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Wine-Poached Pear and Goat Cheese Ricotta Tart

Ingredients:

-Pie dough (I use this recipe and follow the suggestion to replace some of the butter with shortening).

For wine poached pears:
-Two large pears (I used red but any variety would be good. If I used a green pear, though, I’d probably use a white wine to poach)
-Half a bottle of red wine
-An assortment of cinnamon sticks, star anise, cardamom pods, fresh ginger, whole cloves, or ground versions of any of those things
-optional: sugar to taste

For filling:
-1 cup goat cheese
-1 cup ricotta
-1/4c honey

For streusel topping:
-1/2 cup of walnuts
-1/2 cup brown sugar
-1/4 cup cold butter cut in cubes

Directions:
2. Preheat oven to 350F.
2. Shape pie dough into a tart pan, cover with wax paper and fill with pie beans or weights. Par-bake for 12 minutes.
2. Slice pears lengthwise and set aside. Heat up wine with spices to a boil, add pears, lower to a simmer.
3. Mix goat cheese, ricotta, and honey together until combined and creamy in a bowl with a spoon or in the bowl of a standup mixer.
5. To make streusel topping: place walnuts, brown sugar, and butter together in a food processor and pulse until walnuts are chops into small pieces.
4. Remove pears from wine (you can reserve the wine and boil it down for syrup) and place the pears in a layer in the par-baked pie crust. Spoon the goat-cheese, ricotta mixture over and smooth it over.
5. Bake for 30-40 minutes taking it out at the 20 min mark to sprinkle the streusel all over.
6. Let it cool down on the stove top and then chill in the fridge for at least an hour.

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Happy Feast of St. Basil, patron of the order of priests that founded my alma mater.

“A tree is known by its fruit; a man by his deeds. A good deed is never lost; he who sows courtesy reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love.”

Wine-Poached Pear and Goat Cheese Ricotta Tart

Reading, eating, etc.

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Happy Fourth Sunday of Advent! I’m lighting all the candles and linking up!

Reading

1. Books

The Thin Man: If you haven’t seen the William Powell and Myrna Loy film (and the subsequent sequels), you’re truly missing out. It’s the perfect thing to watch during the holidays with cookies and cocktails. The book was a little racier and a little more hardboiled than the film but still a hoot!

Whose Body: I’ve barely started this one but it’s proving as delightful as I imagined.

I Believe in Love: A Personal Retreat Based on the Teaching of St. Therese of Lisieux: I’m about to start this for our next book club and it’s a good thing, because I don’t think I’m going to get to any of my suggested Advent spiritual reading. St. Therese is my confirmation saint and I read Story of a Soul back in junior high but I haven’t touched her writing since. I need to though because she a doctor of the Church and her writing is so accessible and enriching. Also, I keep saying I need to go on a retreat so I’m excited about getting to go on one in book form.

2. Links

-I really enjoy Maria Popova’s labor of love, Brain Pickings, though I frequently save the articles for later and then never get around to them–they demand one’s full attention and I have a mind trained to skim distractedly. But when I do put the mental effort in (and it really doesn’t require thaaat much effort), I’m always glad that I did. The books on her 16 Overall Favorite Books of 2016 all look very good and I’m marking some of them down for my 2017 reads. Also an oldie, but one of my favorite posts she did: 10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings.

Sorting Jane Austen into Hogwarts Houses: The Definitive Guide. This was such a fun post. Now I want to reread all Harry Potter and all Jane Austen. Also, just yes to Mr. Collins being a squib.

Favorite Quotes and Prayers: Christmas. I love quotes. I’ve got notebooks and word docs full of them. So Christina’s beautiful list made my heart sing.

“When we give each other our Christmas presents in his name, let us remember that he has given us the sun and the moon and the stars, the earth with its forests and mountains and oceans and all that lives and moves upon them…And to save us from our own foolishness and from all our sins, he came down to earth and gave himself.” -Sigrid Undset

Eating

3. Feast Day Food:

Honey Cake with Fleur de Sel: made for the St. Ambrose’s feast day (patron of beekeepers) to share with a friend and it was ambrosial on more than one level. Joe ate some for breakfast the next day, left for work, came back up a few minutes later, cut himself a second slice, and declared, “This is my favorite cake.”

Cuccia: For St. Lucy’s Day, I had big plans to wake up early and make cinnamon buns and string up lights around the apartment in honor this saint of light, but that did not happen. It was all good though because this Sicilian wheatberry porridge was splendid. According to the tradition, during a famine in Syracuse in 1646, a ship arrived on St. Lucy’s Day bearing wheat. People were so eager to eat, they didn’t wait to ground the grains, but simply boiled them and dressed them with olive oil–the first cuccia. We ate ours hot with ricotta, chocolate, candied orange slices, and honey. Yum!

4. Advent eating:

Garlic and vinegar fried rice: when you need something easy and meatless (though I threw in some stir fried meat this time), this is one of my favorite go tos.

-Minestrone: I used this as loose guide. Simple and warm and wintry.

Olive oil braised chickpeas: making this tonight with soft-boiled eggs and crusty bread.

5. Christmas baking/cooking plan:

-What are your favorite cookies to make? My signature cookie over the past couple years has been a shortbread cookie sandwich with speculoos filling and dusted with powdered sugar. It’s the tops. I also like to make gingersnaps from this recipe my sister shared with me. And they really do go deliciously with an Old Fashioned (perfect for your Thin Man movie watching). Other than that, I tend to change it up. Do you have favorite Christmas cookie recipes you return to year after year?

-I have a crazy dream this year to do a seven course Christmas Eve dinner after the Provencal and Italian traditions. I’m planning to keep the courses mostly simple: a make ahead chestnut soup, a cheese and fruit course. I just don’t know though. I’m a dreamer and not a very practical planner so we’ll see if it comes off without a hitch…or happens at all.

Et cetera

6. I’m shutting down my etsy shop till sometime in early January as I figure out a new printing situation, work on new products, and make a plan to really get this business going. I’m one to get immobilized over small difficulties, so things have been going slow lately.

7. We’re having a cozy Sunday watching Harry Potter (as a result of reading the Carrots for Michaelmas article) and making paper snowflakes. But the unfairness of our coziness and safety while others are living in the most desperate, war torn circumstances is heartbreaking. We can all donate and we can all pray. When I feel like despairing I think of these words from Tennyson: “More things are wrought by prayer than this world dreams of.” Also, this site helps specify where donations go.

Drop down ye heavens from above

Reading, eating, etc.

Notes on love and meatballs

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When I started dating my husband, I was one of those girls who is in love with love. The kind who craves and feels entitled to the most beautiful love story, the most beautiful engagement story, the most beautiful wedding, and the most beautiful babies.

But on the day my husband and I got engaged, we went to the grocery store. I don’t know why that detail always sticks out to me. I didn’t include it in when I told people our engagement story (I also didn’t include the fact that I was dreading telling my parents whom I didn’t think would be all that stoked that I was engaged at the age of twenty), but I always remember that we went to the grocery store and I was tired and from the moment we left the grocery store to the moment we pulled up at the church, I totally knew I was getting engaged.

The story I told people was all about how Joseph unintentionally chose October 12th to propose which was the Feast of Our Lady of Pilar and was just perfect and providential since in the early days of Jominika, I had prayed for our relationship at the shrine of Our Lady of Pilar in Spain. I told about how Joe liked that my ring had seven stones because it seemed a beautiful symbol: three larger gems for the theological virtues and four smaller ones for the cardinal virtues. I told about how sweetly nervous Joe was and how it reminded me of our first date. I told all the dreamy bits of our engagement story.

And yet, now I love that we went to the grocery store right before we got engaged. I love how ordinary that is when, at the time, all I wanted was the wondrously beautiful parts of love. But those things are a gift and not a right. And the ordinary things which our lives are so full of right now (read: sticky little hands and so much poop) are, in fact, part of something wondrously beautiful and larger than ourselves.

This year we attempted and failed pretty badly at saying a novena to Our Lady of Pilar. We said the prayers dutifully on days 1, 3, and 4 and missed the other six. On the actual day of our engagement anniversary, Joe got home late and went straight into CPA study mode. But I made meatballs and cranked up Dean Martin and danced around with Leo and a few times Joe snuck out of his study cave and danced around with us too. We agreed the meatballs were the very best meatballs we’d ever had and that they made for a perfect engagement-versary feast on an otherwise very ordinary day.

Sage and Ricotta Meatballs (adapted from this recipe):
-2tbs olive oil
-2lbs lean ground beef
-1 cup ricotta cheese
-2 eggs
-1/2 cup red wine
-1/2 cup bread crumbs (I toasted sandwich bread and threw it in the food processor)
-2-3tbs fresh sage chopped up (adjust for taste. I like pretty sagey meatballs.)
-2 cloves of garlic minced (I also like my food garlicky, so just use one or omit if you don’t.)
-2 teaspoons salt
-1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
-fresh grated parmesan or fontina
-tomato sauce (recipe below)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Rub a 9×13-inch baking dish with olive oil.
  2. Combine the ground beef, garlic, ricotta, eggs, wine, bread crumbs, sage, salt, and red pepper flakes in a large mixing bowl and mix by hand until combined well.
  3. Roll the mixture into tightly packed, round balls. Place the balls in the baking dish in close rows. (They can be touching).
  4. Roast for 20 minutes.
  5. When the meatballs are firm and fully cooked, remove them from the oven. Pour the tomato sauce over them. Sprinkle the grated cheese over that. Return the meatballs to the oven and continue roasting for another 15 minutes.

Tomato Sauce
-5 tomatoes
-4 cloves garlic minced (I may have used six or so…)
-bunch of fresh herbs chopped (I used sage since that’s what I had on hand, but basil, oregano, and rosemary would all be good)
-1 cup red wine
-1 large onion chopped
-1 stick of butter
-salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Use a knife to score the bottoms of the tomatoes with an x. Bring salted water in a medium saucepan to a boil. Add tomatoes and boil for five minutes.
  2. Remove tomatoes and pour out the water. Blend the tomatoes in a food processor or blender. (I usually chop my herbs in the food processor first and then add the tomatoes to the mixture).
  3. Heat a little olive oil in the pot. Add garlic and onions and heat until onions are translucent. Add tomato and herbs.
  4. Add red wine and butter.
  5. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until butter is melted.

Some notes:

-Chop and mince everything possible in the food processor and it makes the process so much easier. With sauces and meat mixtures, you’re not looking for pretty.
-Serve with something better than barilla. That fancy imported pasta you never feel you can justify buying, a mound of hot, cheesy polenta, a bowlful of gnocchi. Just do it. It makes all the difference.
-I ended up with too much meatball meat and didn’t have any tomato sauce on hand when I pulled the leftover meat out of the freezer (which explains why the meatballs pictured above are sauce-less). I threw together some brown butter and sage for a sauce and grated a ton of cheese on top and it was almost as good. Almost.

Notes on love and meatballs

All the Possibilities of Pepper Broth


“Listen! The wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves. We have had our summer evenings, now for October eves!” – Humbert Wolfe 

Except I am listening and all I hear is lawnmowers buzzing and police sirens wailing. Ah Houston. My car is still a hot box when I forget to park it in the shade and we still work up a sweat when we go for walks. But! But! There’s a hint of a breeze and I’m officially not a summertime shut-in anymore.

This dried pepper broth is a concoction of my husband’s and is just the thing to simmer on the stove when you’re pretending like the wind is howling and have got your Netflix fireplace channel roaring. Also, I don’t know about traditional Dios de los Muertos foods but I think this would be perf.

It’s warm and earthy and spicy. Drink it straight (with squeezed lime juice!) when you’re snuffling or let your imagination run wild with all its possibilities. We made tacos, soup, and enchiladas from it–a whole week’s worth of meals!

Dried Chile Pepper Broth (and bonus sauce)

olive oil
1 yellow chopped onion
5 cloves fresh peeled chopped garlic
3-4 fresh chopped tomatoes (you can cheat with the canned variety or is it really cheating is tomatoes aren’t in season?)
7-8 assorted dried peppers
1 fresh chopped jalapeno
2-3 fresh chopped habanero peppers
juice of 2 limes (or 4 key limes as pictured)
salt and pepper

Heat a couple of tablespoons of olive oil in a stock pot on medium-high. Add chopped onion and garlic and cook for a few minutes. Add tomato and cook for a few minutes more. Add chopped fresh peppers.

Fill the pot with water. (We never measure these things out but you want the pot to be pretty full.) Add dried peppers, lime juice, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer for 1.5+hours.

Strain and reserve the broth. Remove the stems from the rehydrated dried peppers. Throw all the non-liquid remains (the peppers, garlic, tomatoes, and onion) of the broth into a blender and blend till smooth. Add a few spoons of the broth if needed to thin out a little. Thus, in addition to the broth, you’ll end up with a thick, egyptian-mud-bath-looking pepper sauce that will bless you manifold.

Add some of the broth and sauce to ground beef for tacos, use the broth as a base for tortilla soup, add Mexican chocolate to the sauce and boom! Instant mole! My computer decided to start updating in the middle of this post which made me curse and wish I had a bloody maria made with this broth so there’s another idea for you. Seriously. Endless possibilities here.

All the Possibilities of Pepper Broth

Carbonara Croque Madames

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“Like all magnificent things, it’s very simple.”
-Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting

I frequently feel that if I just buy the organic hand sewn baby clothes, shop at the farmers market, and make my home into one seamless combination of Anthropologie, Restoration Hardware, and West Elm, I’ll be happy. It’s not true of course. If I lived in the perfectly styled photo shoots that paint my social media feeds up and down, I wouldn’t automatically have a meaningful and magnificent life. And when I try to chase after those things, I end up stressed and resentful.

Thankfully, it’s not a question of lavish expense or cheap mass production. Mending, making do, thrifting, and re-purposing can go a long way in adding a little effortless elegance to our lives.

These sandwiches are just that: effortlessly elegant. The bread was a housewarming gift from a friend. The chicken and white wine bechamel were leftovers from this recipe. They came together quickly and easily and only after I pulled them out of the oven, did I realize that what I had on hand was a perfect marriage of chicken carbonara and a croque madame.

If you’re craving something easy but oh so satisfying for a weeknight dinner, pick up a rotisserie chicken and whip these up.

Carbonara Croque Madames

1 large baguette (for four sandwiches)
Chopped leftover roast chicken, rotisserie chicken, or cooked chicken breasts
4 slices of bacon
4 eggs
1 cup white wine béchamel
1 cup grated gruyere (swiss or parmesan may be substituted)

Grease a baking sheet with olive oil and preheat oven to 350F.

Fry bacon to desired crispness. Remove and chop into small pieces. Fry eggs in the remaining bacon grease.

Slice bread into four pieces and then slice lengthwise. Spread béchamel generously on each slice of bread. Sprinkle the gruyere on each slice. Top each sandwich with chicken and bacon.

Place each sandwich half on the baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes. Once the sandwiches are finished baking, place a fried egg on top of each.

Serve with a simple green salad and vinaigrette.

Carbonara Croque Madames

Brandy Plum Syrup and Notes on Namedays

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August 4th has always been a favorite day of mine. This might make very little sense considering how hot it always is (and you know I hate the heat) and how close to the beginning of the school year it is (and trust me, I can give you an earful about how much I hated public school). But August 4th, despite its drawbacks, happens to be my nameday.

I don’t know if I was specifically named after St. Dominic Guzman (ahem, Mom?) but according to Slovak rules, I get his feast as my nameday. His feast is technically August 8th on the General Roman calendar, but in Slovakia, namedays are based on the Tridentine calendar on which his feast falls on the 4th. (Does all this sound like calendaristic gibberish? To me too. As much as I want to live by the liturgical year to a t, I don’t understand all the calendar discrepancies. Jessica is your girl for that.)

Slovaks, all of them–practicing Catholics or not at all, celebrate namedays with equal import as birthdays. You get cake and presents and kisses and well wishes. But I had a very Americanized upbringing, so every August 4th, I’d just get something small: roses or a fancy chocolate bar or a pretty little knick-knack to add to my collection and to form me into the recovering maximalist that I am now.

Once, I actually got to celebrate my nameday in Slovakia. I ate my weight in langos (fried dough slathered with butter and garlic and cheese) and happily received all the aforementioned nameday glories. Yesterday afternoon, as I was about to leave my parents’ house, I mentioned that my nameday was today so my mom put a book (that she’s lending to me) in a gift bag and we basically had to drag the rest of my family down from their various activities to eat ice cream together. I don’t know which nameday celebration I prefer. (No, I actually do but the ridiculousness of the latter does make me laugh.)

There’s no connection to St. Dominic in this recipe for brandy plum syrup. You can google St. Dominic feast day food ideas and get boatloads of those I’m sure. I just happened to have very ripe plums that needed to be used up fast and this ended up being the most simple and luxurious way to do so.

Today for my nameday, I’m going to say a rosary and I’m going to have a bowl of cinnamon vanilla ice cream topped with biscoff cookie crumbles and drenched in this brandy plum syrup. I hope for your nameday you do something equally as simple and luxurious.

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Brandy Plum Syrup

2 cups water
2 cups sugar
5 very ripe black plums
2 tbs brandy or cognac

Chop your plums up into large pieces. Stir water and sugar together over medium high heat until dissolved. Add the brandy and the plums and bring to a boil. Lower to a simmer for at least 25 minutes or until fruit is completely soft. Once cool, pour through a strainer into a container. Store in the fridge.

Tip: Give the leftover plum pieces a whirl in the food processor and eat as a compote over yogurt or oatmeal.

Some other ideas for using your syrup:


Over spiced meatballs with goat cheese mashed potatoes

Drizzled over french toast and warm vanilla custard
Mixed with sparkling water and garnished with a sprig of rosemary
Poured over a hazelnut sponge cake
Thickened by simmering longer and used as a dip on a cheese board
Stop me or I’ll keep going…

 

Brandy Plum Syrup and Notes on Namedays